For College Educators and Instructors

How will a student with an intellectual disability affect my classroom?
A student with an intellectual disability should add to the class environment, like all students. The student is in the class because he or she has a desire to learn about the content that you are presenting.

How will a student with an intellectual disability be able to learn in my class?
A student with an intellectual disability may need extra supports to be successful. Sometimes it may take longer to learn concepts, or the student may learn better auditorily, visually, through participation, or repetition (this is true when we consider diverse learners in general).

What strategies will help a student with an intellectual disability be successful in my class?
Additional supports, including peer mentors, tutors, academic coaches, and assistive technology have proven to be effective for students with intellectual disabilities.

Will my disability support services office provide an accommodations letter for a student with an intellectual disability?
It depends. If the student is taking a course for credit and has applied and been accepted through the traditional admissions process, then the student should register with the school’s office of disability support services. If the student has been admitted through the Comprehensive Transition and Postsecondary (CTP) Program, then he or she is most likely being supported through a Model Demonstration Project. In Kentucky, that is the Supported Higher Education Project.

What resources does the Association for Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD) have on this topic?
AHEAD has a white paper that is a useful resource. Click here to view it.

Who can assist me if I have other questions?
Contact the Supported Higher Education Project.

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